POETRY

Falling Through the Cracks

By

Think cockroach, think the serendipitous
Slither of the things that you don’t see
Or want to see. There’s an apocalypse
Happening at night. You get up and make your coffee.

Later, when your car stumbles—pothole?
Earthquake?—you think you could fall through.
What lives down there, waiting in the sinkhole?
Breathless, you pause: and then you follow through,

But underneath you feel the rancid movement
Of all decay. Bananas gain their spots.
Relationships have reached the turning moment,
Unburied hatchets ready. The dry earth begets
Emptiness—flexing one muscle, then another,
The zigzags breaking the back of your mother.

Kim Bridgford is the director of the West Chester University Poetry Center and the West Chester University Poetry Conference, the largest all-poetry writing conference in the United States. As the editor of Mezzo Cammin, she founded The Mezzo Cammin Women Poets Timeline Project, which was launched at the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington in March 2010. She is the author of seven books of poetry, including Bully Pulpit, a book of poems on bullying, and the forthcoming Epiphanies.

She has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Philadelphia Inquirer, The Connecticut Post, on NPR and the website of The News Hour with Jim Lehrer, and in various headline news outlets.

But underneath you feel the rancid movement
Of all decay. Bananas gain their spots.